Skip to main content

Pancreatic Cancer clinical trials at UC Irvine

15 in progress, 7 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of Zenocutuzumab (MCLA-128) in Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring an NRG1 Fusion (eNRGy)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase I/II, open-label, multi-center, multi-national, dose escalation, single agent study to assess the safety, tolerability, PK, PD, immunogenicity and anti-tumor activity of zenocutuzumab (MCLA-128) in patients with solid tumors harboring an NRG1 fusion (eNRGy)

    Irvine, California and other locations

  • Electron Beam Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Following Chemoradiation in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer With Vascular Involvement

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This research study is studying an intervention as a possible treatment for pancreatic cancer.

    Irvine, California and other locations

  • Study of AMG 199 in Subjects With MUC17-Positive Solid Tumors Including Gastric, Gastroesophageal Junction, Colorectal, and Pancreatic Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18-99

    To evaluate the safety and tolerability of AMG 199 in adult subjects and to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and/or recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D).

    Orange, California and other locations

  • Study of Seribantumab in Adult Patients With NRG1 Gene Fusion Positive Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study is an open-label, international, multi-center, Phase 2 study in adult patients with recurrent, locally-advanced or metastatic solid tumors, which harbor the NRG1 gene fusion.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma (The MATCH Screening Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    Costa Mesa, California and other locations

  • Testing the Addition of Pembrolizumab, an Immunotherapy Cancer Drug to Olaparib Alone as Therapy for Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Has Spread With Inherited BRCA Mutations

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies whether adding pembrolizumab to olaparib (standard of care) works better than olaparib alone in treating patients with pancreatic cancer with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). BRCA1 and BRCA2 are human genes that produce tumor suppressor proteins. These proteins help repair damaged deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and, therefore, play a role in ensuring the stability of each cell's genetic material. When either of these genes is mutated, or altered, such that its protein product is not made or does not function correctly, DNA damage may not be repaired properly. As a result, cells are more likely to develop additional genetic alterations that can lead to some types of cancer, including pancreatic cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Olaparib is an inhibitor of PARP, a protein that helps repair damaged DNA. Blocking PARP may help keep tumor cells from repairing their damaged DNA, causing them to die. PARP inhibitors are a type of targeted therapy. The addition of pembrolizumab to the usual treatment of olaparib may help to shrink tumors in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • Testing the Combination of Anetumab Ravtansine With Either Nivolumab, Nivolumab and Ipilimumab, or Gemcitabine and Nivolumab in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of anetumab ravtansine when given together with nivolumab, ipilimumab and gemcitabine hydrochloride in treating patients with mesothelin positive pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Anetumab ravtansine is a monoclonal antibody, called anetumab ravtansine, linked to a chemotherapy drug called DM4. Anetumab attaches to mesothelin positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers DM4 to kill them. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving anetumab ravtansine together with nivolumab, ipilimumab, and gemcitabine hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • Testing the Addition of a New Anti-cancer Drug, M3814 (Peposertib), to Radiation Therapy for Localized Pancreatic Cancer

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of M3814 and to see how well it works when given together with radiation therapy in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that cannot be removed by surgery and has not spread to other parts of the body (localized). M3814 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Giving M3814 and hypofractionated radiation therapy together may work better than radiation therapy alone in the treatment of patients with localized pancreatic cancer.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • A Study of BMS-813160 in Combination With Chemotherapy or Nivolumab in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety profile, tolerability, drug levels, drug effects, and preliminary efficacy of BMS-813160 alone or in combination with either chemotherapy or nivolumab or chemotherapy plus nivolumab in participants with metastatic colorectal and pancreatic cancers.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • A Study to Assess the Effectiveness and Safety of Irinotecan Liposome Injection, 5-fluorouracil/Leucovorin Plus Oxaliplatin in Patients Not Previously Treated for Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer, Compared to Nab-paclitaxel+Gemcitabine Treatment

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to look at the efficacy and safety of Irinotecan liposome injection in combination with other approved drugs used for cancer therapy, namely 5 fluorouracil/leucovorin (5FU/LV) plus oxaliplatin compared to nab-paclitaxel + gemcitabine treatment in improving the overall survival of patients not previously treated for metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    Costa Mesa, California and other locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy (mFOLFIRINOX) with or without hypofractionated radiation therapy before surgery works in patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in combination chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. It is not yet known if combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without hypofractionated radiation therapy before surgery in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without Erlotinib Hydrochloride Followed by the Same Chemotherapy Regimen With or Without Radiation Therapy and Capecitabine or Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Has Been Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II-R/III trial studies gemcitabine hydrochloride with or without erlotinib hydrochloride followed by the same chemotherapy regimen with or without radiation therapy and capecitabine or fluorouracil in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that was removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, capecitabine, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Erlotinib hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving chemotherapy together with or without erlotinib hydrochloride and/or radiation therapy after surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery. It is not yet known whether chemotherapy is more effective when given with or without erlotinib hydrochloride and/or radiation therapy in treating pancreatic cancer.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • Pilot Comparing ctDNA IDV vs. SPV Sample in Pts Undergoing Biopsies for Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Cancers

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is a prospective pilot protocol investigating whether ctDNA detection be improved by sampling the cancer draining vein versus the standard practice of sampling from a peripheral vein in patients who are undergoing biopsies for hepatobiliary and pancreatic cancers.

    Orange, California

  • S1313, PEGPH20 in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This partially randomized phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of pegylated recombinant human hyaluronidase (PEGPH20) when given together with combination chemotherapy and to see how well they work compared with combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Pegylated recombinant human hyaluronidase may help chemotherapy drugs work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the drugs. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without pegylated recombinant human hyaluronidase in treating pancreatic cancer.

    Costa Mesa, California and other locations

  • S1505: Combination Chemotherapy or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, and oxaliplatin (combination chemotherapy) works and compares to gemcitabine hydrochloride and paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation before surgery in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, oxaliplatin, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective than gemcitabine hydrochloride and paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation before surgery in treating pancreatic cancer.

    Orange, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Pancreatic Cancer research studies include .

Last updated: