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Urinary Tract Infection clinical trials at UC Irvine
2 in progress, 1 open to new patients

  • The INSPIRE-ASP UTI Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The INSPIRE-ASP UTI trial is a cluster-randomized controlled trial of HCA hospitals comparing routine empiric antibiotic stewardship practices with real-time precision medicine computerized physician order entry smart prompts providing the probability that a non-critically ill adult admitted with UTI is infected with a resistant pathogen. Note: that enrolled "subjects" represents 59 individual HCA hospitals that have been randomized.

    Riverside, California and other locations

  • Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for the Treatment of Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Recurrent urinary tract infections are quickly becoming a public health obstacle in our aging population. Almost 50% of women have at least one urinary tract infection in their lifetime; following this first infection, there is a 25-35% chance that she will have another infection in the subsequent 3-6 months. With each documented infection, a patient receives anywhere from a three to seven day course of antibiotics for treatment. Repeated courses of antibiotics often lead to the development of multi-drug resistant infections that are difficult to treat with our arsenal of oral medications. It is theorized that most, if not all, urinary tract infections are caused by bacteria from the gastrointestinal tract. If there is a generalized gut dysbiosis due to repeated courses of oral antibiotics, it will likely be difficult to ever adequately treat repeat urinary tract infections. This same theory led to the development and utilization of fecal microbiota transplantation in the treatment of refractory Clostridium difficile diarrhea. There are now several studies that have reported on the efficacy of fecal transplantation in the treatment of C.difficile infections as well as the correction of gut dysbiosis. Given this positive response in treatment of refractory infectious diarrhea, the investigators propose that the correction of gut dysbiosis can also treat refractory recurrent urinary tract infections. Therefore, the investigators propose this pilot study to determine the effectiveness of fecal transplantation in the treatment of refractory, recurrent urinary tract infections.

    Orange, California

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