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Acute Myeloid Leukemia clinical trials at UC Irvine

17 in progress, 11 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of JNJ-75276617 in Participants With Acute Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to determine the recommended Phase 2 dose(s) (RP2D[s]) of JNJ-75276617 in Part 1 (Dose Escalation) and to determine safety and tolerability at the RP2D(s) in Part 2 (Dose Expansion).

    Orange, California and other locations

  • BLAST MRD AML-1: BLockade of PD-1 Added to Standard Therapy to Target Measurable Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia 1- A Randomized Phase 2 Study of Anti-PD-1 Pembrolizumab in Combination With Intensive Chemotherapy as Frontline Therapy in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    This phase II trial studies how well cytarabine and idarubicin or daunorubicin with or without pembrolizumab work in treating patients with newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cytarabine, idarubicin, and daunorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving induction chemotherapy with pembrolizumab may work better than induction chemotherapy alone in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • CPX-351 and Glasdegib for Newly Diagnosed Acute Myelogenous Leukemia With MDS Related Changes or Therapy-related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase 2 single-arm, open-label clinical trial determining efficacy of CPX-351 in combination with Glasdegib in subjects with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia with myelodysplastic syndrome related changes or therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • Gilteritinib vs Midostaurin in FLT3 Mutated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    Eligible untreated patients with FLT3 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) between the ages of 18 and 70 will be randomized to receive gilteritinib or midostaurin during induction and consolidation. Patients will also receive standard chemotherapy of daunorubicin and cytarabine during induction and high-dose cytarabine during consolidation. Gilteritinib, is an oral drug that works by stopping the leukemia cells from making the FLT3 protein. This may help stop the leukemia cells from growing faster and thus may help make chemotherapy more effective. Gilteritinib has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for patients who have relapsed or refractory AML with a FLT3 mutation but is not approved by the FDA for newly diagnosed FLT3 AML, and its use in this setting is considered investigational. Midostaurin is an oral drug that works by blocking several proteins on cancer cells, including FLT3 that can help leukemia cells grow. Blocking this pathway can cause death to the leukemic cells. Midostaurin is approved by the FDA for the treatment of FLT3 AML. The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of gilteritinib to midostaurin in patients receiving combination chemotherapy for FLT3 AML.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • IMGN632 as Monotherapy or With Venetoclax and/or Azacitidine for Patients With CD123-Positive Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18-120

    This is an open-label, multicenter, Phase 1b/2 study to determine the safety and tolerability of IMGN632 and assess the antileukemia activity of IMGN632 when administered in combination with azacitidine and/or venetoclax in patients with relapsed and frontline CD123-positive AML, and antileukemia activity of IMGN632 when administered as monotherapy in patients with MRD+ AML after frontline treatment.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • IO-202 as Monotherapy and IO-202 Plus Azacitidine in Patients in AML and CMML

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    To assess safety and tolerability at increasing dose levels of IO-202 as monotherapy and in combination with Azacitidine in successive cohorts of participants with relapsed or refractory AML with monocytic differentiation and CMML in order to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or maximum administered dose (MAD) and select the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) and dose schedule as monotherapy and combination therapy.

    Irvine, California and other locations

  • Pitavastatin in Combination With Venetoclax for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase I, dose-escalation, open-label clinical trial determining the safety and tolerability of adding Pitavastatin to Venetoclax in subjects with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). These are subjects who are newly diagnosed subjects with AML who are ineligible for intensive induction chemotherapy, relapsed/refractory CLL or newly diagnosed CLL.

    Orange, California

  • Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Magrolimab in Combination With Azacitidine Versus Physician's Choice of Venetoclax in Combination With Azacitidine or Intensive Chemotherapy in Previously Untreated Adults With TP53 Mutant Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of magrolimab + azacitidine versus venetoclax + azacitidine in adults with previously untreated TP53 mutant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are appropriate for non-intensive therapy as measured by overall survival (OS).

    Orange, California and other locations

  • TL-895 and KRT-232 Study in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study evaluates TL-895, a potent, orally available and highly selective irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitor combined with KRT-232, a novel oral small molecule inhibitor of MDM2 for the treatment of adults with FLT3 mutated Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Participants must be relapsed/refractory (e.g., having failed prior therapy) to be eligible for this study.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • Trial of DFP-10917 vs Non-Intensive or Intensive Reinduction for AML Patients in 2nd/3rd/4th Salvage

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Phase III, multicenter, randomized study with two arms (1:1 ratio) enrolling patients with AML relapsed/refractory after 2, 3, or 4 prior induction regimens: Experimental arm: DFP-10917 14-day continuous intravenous (IV) infusion at a dose of 6 mg/m²/day followed by a 14-day resting period per 28-day cycles. Control arm: Non-Intensive Reinduction (LoDAC, Azacitidine, Decitabine, Venetoclax Combination Regimens) or Intensive Reinduction (High and Intermediate Dose Cytarabine Regimens), depending on the patient's prior induction treatment.

    Irvine, California and other locations

  • Using the Anticancer Drug Olaparib to Treat Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome With an Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH) Mutation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well olaparib works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory), or myelodysplastic syndrome. Patients must also have a change in the gene called the IDH gene (IDH mutation). Olaparib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. This study is being done to see if olaparib is better or worse in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome compared to the standard chemotherapy drugs.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • A Study of ASP2215 (Gilteritinib) by Itself, ASP2215 Combined With Azacitidine or Azacitidine by Itself to Treat Adult Patients Who Have Recently Been Diagnosed With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With a FLT3 Gene Mutation and Who Cannot Receive Standard Chemotherapy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a clinical study for adult patients who have recently been diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia or AML. AML is a type of cancer. It is when bone marrow makes white blood cells that are not normal. These are called leukemia cells. Some patients with AML have a mutation, or change, in the FLT3 gene. This gene helps leukemia cells make a protein called FLT3. This protein causes the leukemia cells to grow faster. For patients with AML who cannot receive standard chemotherapy, azacitidine (also known as Vidaza®) is a current standard of care treatment option in the United States. This clinical study is testing an experimental medicine called ASP2215, also known as gilteritinib. Gilteritinib works by stopping the leukemia cells from making the FLT3 protein. This can help stop the leukemia cells from growing faster. This study will compare two different treatments. Patients are assigned to one of these two groups by chance: a medicine called azacitidine, also known as Vidaza®, or an experimental medicine gilteritinib in combination with azacitidine. There is a twice as much chance to receive both medicines combined than azacitidine alone. The clinical study may help show which treatment helps patients live longer.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • A Study of Pevonedistat and Venetoclax Combined With Azacitidine to Treat Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) in Adults Unable to Receive Intensive Chemotherapy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The main aim is to see how the combination of pevonedistat + venetoclax + azacitidine compares to venetoclax + azacitidine in adults recently diagnosed with AML who are unable to be treated with intensive chemotherapy. Participants will receive either pevonedistat + venetoclax + azacitidine or venetoclax + azacitidine in 28-day treatment cycles. Bone marrow samples (biopsy) will be collected throughout the study. Pevonedistat will be given as an intravenous (IV) infusion and Azacitidine will be given through IV or subcutaneous (under the skin). Study treatments may continue as long as the participant is receiving benefit from it. Participants may choose to stop treatment at any time.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • CPX-351 and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase Ib trial studies the best dose of gemtuzumab ozogamicin when given together with CPX-351 in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back after it was previously in remission. CPX-351 is a chemotherapy, which works in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called gemtuzumab, linked to chemotherapy called calicheamicin. Gemtuzumab attaches to CD33 (transmembrane receptor) positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Giving CPX-351 and gemtuzumab ozogamicin may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, compared to giving only one of these therapies alone.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • Dociparstat (DSTAT) in Combination With Standard Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (DASH AML)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Phase 3 study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of dociparstat sodium in adults with newly diagnosed untreated AML with adverse or intermediate genetic risk.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • Efficacy of Oral Azacitidine Plus Best Supportive Care as Maintenance Therapy in Subjects With Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) in Complete Remission

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study enrolled 472 participants, aged 55 or older, with a diagnosis of de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or AML secondary to prior myelodysplastic disease or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), and who have achieved first complete remission (CR)/ complete remission with incomplete blood count recovery (CRi) following induction with or without consolidation chemotherapy. The study is amended to include an extension phase (EP). The EP allows participants who are currently receiving oral azacitidine and who are demonstrating clinical benefit as assessed by the investigator, to continue receiving oral azacitidine after unblinding by sponsor until the participant meets the criteria for study discontinuation or until oral azacitidine becomes commercially available and reimbursed. In addition, all participants in the placebo arm and participants who had been discontinued from the treatment phase (irrespective of randomization arm) and continuing in the follow-up phase will be followed for survival in the EP.

    Orange, California and other locations

  • Study to Determine the Efficacy of Uproleselan (GMI-1271) in Combination With Chemotherapy to Treat Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will evaluate the efficacy of uproleselan (GMI-1271), a specific E-selectin antagonist, in combination with chemotherapy to treat relapsed/refractory AML, compared to chemotherapy alone. The safety of uproleselan when given with chemotherapy will also be investigated in patients with relapsed/refractory AML

    Orange, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Acute Myeloid Leukemia research studies include .

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